Zandvlei Trust

Insects - Moths


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Brown Vapourer (IBracharoa dregei)  Larvae feed on Osteospermum in the coastal scrub.
                                                                                                             new 18/11/2012.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Pine Emperor (Imbrasia cytherea)  Found on Muizenberg beach early in the morning.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Belted Burnet (Callosymploca)  wingspan 25mm, a day flying moth.


photograph by Greg Morgan. 

Karoo Moth (Loxostege frustalis) wingspan 20mm.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Clay Monkey (Phyllalia patens) medium size 30mm wingspan. Larvae feed on grass.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Black and White lines  (Grammodes exclusiva) medium wingspan of 30mm. Larvae feed on citrus.

Specious Tiger Moth (Aganais speciosa) The larvae feed on ficus trees and poison bush (Acikanthera).
Wing span 60mm.

Lily Leaf Miner (Brithys pancratii) A larvae eating a lily leaf. They occur in large numbers on the plants.


photograph by Greg Morgan.                                                      photograph by Greg Morgan.

Fulvous Hawk Moth (Coelonia mauritii) Large wingspan 110mm, proboscis very long. Larvae feed on lantana, tecomaria, salvia, bigonia convulvulus.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Fulvous Hawk Moth (Coelonia mauritii) Larvae chomping the leaf.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Fulvous Hawk Moth (Coelonia mauritii) What a magnificent creature!


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Barred Carpet (Xanthorhoe poseata)  Wingspan 22mm, larvae feed on letuce.

Death's Head Hawk Moth larvae (Omphacodes) Body length +/- 140mm long and +/- 20mm diameter, feeds on night shade plants.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Death's Head Hawk Moth larvae (Omphacodes) Take 1.
Topside.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Death's Head Hawk Moth larvae (Omphacodes) Take 2.
Underside.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Death's Head Hawk Moth larvae (Omphacodes) Take 3.
Left side.

Does anyone know what this larvae turns into?
It was feeding on a small species of vygie (wild fig - fynbos species).   Contact Gavin Lawson.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Emerald (Omphacodes) Wingspan 20mm found at Lakeside.


photograph by Cassy Sheasby.

Heady Maiden (Syntomis cerbera) with 4 red bands on its body.

Bauers Frother (Amerila bauri) 60mm wingspan, tan with clear windows in the wings. Black dots on thorax. Produce a foam ball if handled roughly.

African Hummingbird Moth (Macroglossum trochilus) wingspan 40mm, feed during the day.

These beautiful pearl-like eggs were laid on
the trunk of a tree facing north.

Duster (Pingasa abyssinaria) 45mm wingspan. This is a characteristic resting position.


                              photograph by Greg Morgan.                                          photograph by Greg Morgan.

Tri coloured Tiger Moth  (Rhodogastria amasis) with a 60mm  wingspan. They have bright red orange
and yellow colouring on the abdomen. Larvae is a large black catapillar with brown bristles called "woolly bear", often seen feeding on Bitou bush (Chrysanthemoides).


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Tri coloured Tiger Moth  (Rhodogastria amasis) mating pair.

Sad Goat Moth (Cossus tristis) This one got wet and was vibrating to get the water off. Its larvae bore into tree trunks.

Cream striped Owl (Cyligramma latona) Large 75mm wingspan with beautiful eye markings on the top side.

Does anyone know what this catipillar changes into?     Contact Gavin Lawson.


photograph by Greg Morgan.

Silver striped Hawk Moth (Hippotion celerio)  See below.             new 18/11/2012.

Silver striped Hawk Moth (Hippotion celerio)  The larvae feed on arum lilies, impatients and accacias. The 2 dots to the left of the tail are eggs just laid on an arum lily leaf.

Look what hatched out of the eggs and grew into this very large catapillar, after demolishing a stand of arum lilies.


photograph by Martin Reitz.                                  photograph by Martin Reitz.

A Cape Lappet moth caterpillar         This is an example of the caterpillar with host flies eggs
(Pachypasa capensis)                          on its back. The larvae hatch and feed on the caterpillar.

They are commonly found on Bitou bushes (Chrysanthemoides monilifera) in the winter and spring.

A Cape Lappet moth coccoon spun into Buffalo grass leaves. The Port Jackson tree leaves are 
also used. Found early November 2004 on Wildwood Island.

The moth emerging from the cocoon on 04/12/2004.

Moth emerged quicker than the camera button               It has large antenae.
could be released. Note the length of the wings
in relation to the body length.

The wings expanded in 1/2 hour.                    The wings are longer than the body after an hour
                                                                   and folded down in the resting position.

                                                                                                                                      

Top of page  Back  Home